Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

In the context of the increased attention in the lay and medical press to structural racism in the aftermath of the recent high-profile deaths of African-Americans at the hands of the criminal justice system, this web series will examine the intersections of race and ethnicity, racism, sexual orientation, social justice and health to better understand the myriad ways these important factors lead to health care disparities in our communities.

Hosted by renowned health care leaders at Harvard Medical School, this series will feature experts, academics and advocates to offer clinical and actionable insights on race and social justice issues. We hope you will join us for these difficult but necessary conversations.

Recordings

Please note credits are no longer available for the older recordings and recordings prior to April 2021 have been removed.

The Dual Impact of Race and Rural Status on Health Care Disparities Presenters
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 9/29/2021

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE:

    The Dual Impact of Race and Rural Status on Health Care Disparities

    This session will explore the disparate impact of rurality on health disparities seen in the Southeastern United States compared to other parts of the country. The panel will further discuss the reasons for inequities in health among rural populations, particularly in ethnic minority populations, the challenges to creating a just culture in these communities and the potential solutions to these disparities. 

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 9/30/2021 

    TERMINATION DATE: 3/30/2022 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Moderator:

    • Errol D. Crook, MD, Director, Center for Healthy Communities; Abraham A. Mitchell Professor and Chair, Department of Internal Medicine, University of South Alabama, College of Medicine

    Panelists:

    • Pamela Payne-Foster, MD, MPH, Professor of Community Medicine and Population Health; Deputy Director for Community Outreach, Institute for Rural Health Research, College of Community Health Sciences, University of Alabama

    Eddie Greene, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine; Member, Board of Trustees, Mayo Clinic

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    1. Review the impacts of health inequities among rural residents of the American South, particularly among ethnic minorities

    2. Identify challenges to creating a just culture in these communities

    3. Define the meaning of “health equity”

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

     

Screenshot from start of the webinar
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 7/21/2021

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Decolonizing Global Health

    The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many issues in “global health” to light, not the least of which is: What is "Global Health”? Much of global health has been considered health research or health care practiced “elsewhere," most often driven by individuals based in the global North, in settings in the global South. Over the past year given recognition of the necessary reckoning with persistent social and structural injustice globally, there have been increasing calls to “decolonize global health.” The calls have highlighted imbalances in global health knowledge production, research practices, funding, opportunities and acknowledgement of research contributions from researchers in the global South, the relevance of some research questions, as well as the necessity to acknowledge the persistent “white (or Northern) saviour” mentality in many research and clinical practices conducted under the banner of global health. The roots of current global health practices are deep and intertwined with the legacy of colonialism. “Decolonizing” global health will require soul searching on many fronts and collective engagement to introduce meaningful change.

    The discussion will focus on the origins of global health and how this legacy impacts current practices, to raise awareness and debate the need to decolonize global health, as well as to acknowledge the complexity inherent in this process. The discussion will also focus on the need to develop a way forward which builds on existing strengths while being responsive and respectful of all participants and supports constructive change.

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 7/29/2021 

    TERMINATION DATE: 1/22/2022 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Moderator:

    • Valerie Luyckx, MD, Associate Scientist, Renal Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School; Honorary Associate Professor, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Cape Town; Deputy Chair Advocacy Working Group, International Society of Nephrology

    Panelists:

    • Mariam Olivia Fofana, MD, PhD,  Division of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School
    • Desmond Jumbam, BA, MSc, Health Policy Analyst, Operation Smile; Co-founder and President, Jumbam Family Foundation
    • Munshi Shehnaz, Health Policy and Systems Researcher; Occupational Therapist; Project Manager, Sheiham Family/Wits Programme on Social Determinants of Health and Health Equity, School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand 

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    1. Review the origins of global health and discuss how this legacy impacts current practices

    2. Identify imbalances in global health knowledge production research practices, funding, opportunities and acknowledgement of research contributions from researchers in the global South

    3. Define the meaning of “decolonizing” global health

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

  • References

    One of the most powerful myths of the twentieth century was the notion that the elimination of colonial administrations amounted to the decolonisation of the world. The heterogeneous and multiple global structures put in place over the 450 years did not evaporate with the juridical-political decolonisation of the periphery over the past 50 years. We continue to live under the same ‘colonial matrix of power' (Grosfoguel, 2011)

    Grosfoguel, R. (2011) ‘Decolonizing Post-Colonial Studies and Paradigms of Political-Economy: Transmodernity, Decolonial Thinking, and Global Coloniality’, TRANSMODERNITY: Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World, 1(1). doi: 10.5070/t411000004.

    Coloniality is the condition that survives beyond the period of colonisation (Ndlovu-Gatsheni, 2013)

    Maldonado-Torres, N. (2007) ‘On the coloniality of being: Contributions to the development of a concept’, Cultural Studies, 21(2–3), pp. 240–270. doi: 10.1080/09502380601162548.

    As modern subjects we breathe coloniality all the time and everyday (Maldonado-Torres, 2007)

    Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S. J. (2013) ‘Perhaps decoloniality is the answer? Critical reflections on development from a decolonial epistemic perspective’, Africanus, 43(2), pp. 1–12.

    Decoloniality is a political, epistemological and economic liberation project aimed at dislodging coloniality and its manifestations (Ndlovu-Gatsheni, 2015)

    Ndlovu-Gatsheni, S. J. (2015) ‘Decoloniality as the Future of Africa’, History Compass, 13(10), pp. 485–496. doi: 10.1111/hic3.12264.

Screenshot from start of the webinar including COVID-19 video title
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 6/21/2021

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Structural Equity: Lessons from 2020

    2020 has been difficult and transformational, as it relates to health equity. The dual pandemics of COVID-19 and the resurgence of racist events have led to major reckonings on how health care and society can be more just and equitable. This presentation will share key lessons from these experiences. 

    Dr. Joseph Betancourt is a nationally and internationally recognized expert in health policy, health care disparities, diversity and cross-cultural medicine. He has worked with more than 100 hospitals and 45 health plans across the country to address health disparities and brings a unique, policy-focused perspective to lessons learned from COVID-19 and the path to achieving equity. 

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 6/21/2021 

    TERMINATION DATE: 12/21/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Presenter:

    • Joseph Betancourt, MD, MPH, Senior Vice-President, Equity and Community Health, Massachusetts General Hospital

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    1. Discuss the historical context of disparities and equity before, during, and after the Covid-19 pandemic and the murder of George Floyd

    2. Identify causes for racial/ethnic disparities in health

    3. Review lessons learned and key findings around Covid-19 and equity

    4. Review lessons learned and key findings around racism and structural equity

     

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy