Addressing Health Disparities: Clinical Insights on Race and Social Justice

In the context of the increased attention in the lay and medical press to structural racism in the aftermath of the recent high-profile deaths of African-Americans at the hands of the criminal justice system, this web series will examine the intersections of race and ethnicity, racism, sexual orientation, social justice and health to better understand the myriad ways these important factors lead to health care disparities in our communities.

Hosted by renowned health care leaders at Harvard Medical School, this series will feature experts, academics and advocates to offer clinical and actionable insights on race and social justice issues. We hope you will join us for these difficult but necessary conversations.

October Recordings

September Recordings

Past Recordings

Screenshot from October 14 webinar
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 10/14/2020

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Join our panelists for an overview of the systemic effects of racism on health and health disparities discussed within a framework of The Family Van, a mobile clinic operated by Community Health Workers that was co-created with neighborhood leaders almost 30 years ago. Topics include naming and addressing racism within the health care system's structures and how the Family Van plays a significant role in their community by breaking racial barriers.

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 10/15/2020 

    TERMINATION DATE: 4/15/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Panelists:

    • Mollie Williams, DrPH, MPH, Executive Director, The Family Van 
    • Beatrice Antoine, MSW Candidate, Volunteer Program Manager, The Family Van
    • Nancy Oriol, MD, Faculty Associate Dean for Community Engagement in Medical Education; Lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine; Co-founder of the Family Van

     DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    • Identify ways which structural racism creates poor health outcomes
    • Discuss actions for advancing health equity

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5004663/

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/B9780128158760000085

    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12882-019-1502-z

     https://proceedings.med.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Wells-A200421LW-rko-Wells-Lindsay-M.D.-BLM-formatted.pdf

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

     

Screenshot of panelist presenting webinar
Screenshot from 9.30 webinar
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 9/30/2020

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Join us to review this discussion on the intersections of racism, social justice and health to better understand the myriad ways these important factors lead to health care disparities in our communities. During this webinar, our panelists will propose clinical and actionable changes required to improve care for individuals with sickle cell disease.  

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 10/1/2020 

    TERMINATION DATE: 4/1/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Moderator:

    • Maureen M. Achebe, MD, MPH, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Clinical Director, Div. of Hematology, Brigham and Women's Hospital

    Panelist:

    • Kenneth Bridges, MD, Vice President, Medical Affairs, Global Blood Therapeutics
    • Venee Tubman, MD, MMSc, Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology/Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine 
    • Andrew Campbell, MD, Director, Comprehensive Sickle Cell Disease Program, Children’s National Hospital

     

    Course Planners:

    • Cheryl R. Clark, MD, ScD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Director, Health Equity Research & Intervention, Center for Community Health and Health Equity, General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital
    • Kevin Tucker, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Chief of Nephrology, Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospital; Medical Director, DCI Faulkner Dialysis Clinic; Faculty Director for Accreditation and MOC, Harvard Medical School 

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    • Identify social determinants of health that adversely affect sickle cell patients
    • Discuss challenges and interventions for recognizing and improving health care disparities

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

     

    Power-Hays, A, McGann PT. When Actions Speak Louder Than Words - Racism and Sickle Cell Disease: NEJM. 2020 Sep 1; DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp2022125 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp2022125

    Nelson SC, Hackman HW. Race matters: perceptions of race and racism in a sickle cell center. Pediatr Blood Cancer. 2013 Mar;60(3):451-4. doi: 10.1002/pbc.24361. Epub 2012 Sep 28. PMID: 23023789. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23023789/

     

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

     

Screenshot of panelist Reverend Traci Blackmon
  • Activity and Accreditation Information

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 9/23/2020

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION: Rev. Traci Blackmon, an ordained minister and registered nurse, discusses the structural roots of health care disparities. Drawn from her experiences in St. Louis, Rev. Blackmon will provide historic context regarding structural racism and their continued impact on health as well as key takeaways for clinicians wishing to improve patient health by addressing structural issues.

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 9/24/2020 

    TERMINATION DATE: 3/24/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Course Planners

    • J. Kevin Tucker, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS, Chief of Nephrology, Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospital; Medical Director, DCI Faulkner Dialysis Clinic; Faculty Director for Accreditation and MOC, Harvard Medical School
    • Cheryl R. Clark, MD, ScD, Director, Health Equity Research & Intervention, Center for Community Health and Health Equity; Hospitalist, Brigham Health Hospital Medicine Unit, Division of General Internal Medicine & Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    Moderator:

    • Ellen Long-Middleton, PhD, APRN, Family Nurse Practitioner, Board Certified Fellow, National Academy of Practice; Lead Nurse Planner, Postgraduate Medical Education (PGME), Harvard Medical School

    Panelists:

    • Rev. Traci Blackmon, Associate General Minister of Justice & Local Church Ministries for The United Church of Christ and Senior Pastor of Christ The King United Church of Christ in Florissant, MO

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    • Discuss the historical context of structural racism and its continued impact on health outcomes.
    • Identify examples of structural racism in their own environments.
    • Discuss challenges related to addressing structural racism as it relates to health in the communities where they serve.

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    Diana Hernández, Carolyn B. Swope, “Housing as a Platform for Health and Equity: Evidence and Future Directions”, American Journal of Public Health 109, no. 10 (October 1, 2019): pp. 1363-1366.

    Webb Hooper M, Nápoles AM, Pérez-Stable EJ. COVID-19 and Racial/Ethnic Disparities. JAMA. 2020;323(24):2466–2467. doi:10.1001/jama.2020.8598

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

     

Screenshot of participants in the September 9th webinar
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 9/9/2020

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Join our panelists as they discuss heart disease in African Americans and strategies to reduce the rate of premature death. Topics include access to cardiology care, health equity models, and potential solutions.

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 9/10/2020 

    TERMINATION DATE: 3/10/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Course Planners:

    • Cheryl R. Clark, MD, ScD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School Director, Health Equity Research & Intervention, Center for Community Health and Health Equity, General Internal Medicine and Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    Course Planner and Moderator:

    • Kevin Tucker, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Chief of Nephrology, Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospital; Medical Director, DCI Faulkner Dialysis Clinic; Faculty Director for Accreditation and MOC, Harvard Medical School 

    Panelists:

    • Benjamin D. Perkins, MA, MDiv, Vice President, Multicultural Initiatives/Health Equity, American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, Founders Affiliate (NJ, NY, CT, RI, MA, VT, NH, ME)
    • Lenny Lopez, MD, MPH, MDiv, FAHA, Associate Professor, Department of Medicine, University of California; Chief of Hospital Medicine, San Francisco VA Medical Center

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    • Identify patients at-risk for inequitable heart disease care
    • Discuss challenges and interventions for improving cardiac care in the communities where providers practice

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    https://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/omh/browse.aspx?lvl=4&lvlid=19

    Clark D, Colantonio LD, Min Y, et al. Population-Attributable Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Associated With Hypertension in Black Adults. JAMA Cardiol. 2019;4(12):1194–1202. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2019.3773

    Leigh, J.A., Alvarez, M. & Rodriguez, C.J. Ethnic Minorities and Coronary Heart Disease: an Update and Future Directions. Curr Atheroscler Rep 18, 9 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11883-016-0559-4

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy

     

Screenshot of participants in the September 2 webinar
  • Activity Description and Accreditation

    NOTE: This video was originally recorded on 9/2/2020

    ACTIVITY DESCRIPTION AND TARGET AUDIENCE: Experts discuss how structural racism explains the pattern of morbidity and mortality from COVID-19 while covering topics that include the social and structural determinants of health. Historic examples of racism are offered as well as key takeaways for clinicians wishing to improve patient health by addressing the structural issues that are highlighted by COVID-19.

    ACTIVITY INFORMATION

    DATE OF ORIGINAL RELEASE: 9/3/2020 

    TERMINATION DATE: 3/3/2021 (Please note that credit will no longer be issued for the activity after this date)

    ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE ACTIVITY 1 hour

    ACTIVITY PLANNERS AND FACULTY:

    Course Planner

    • J. Kevin Tucker, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine, HMS, Chief of Nephrology, Brigham and Women’s/Faulkner Hospital; Medical Director, DCI Faulkner Dialysis Clinic; Faculty Director for Accreditation and MOC, Harvard Medical School

    Course Planner and Moderator:

    • Cheryl R. Clark, MD, ScD, Director, Health Equity Research & Intervention, Center for Community Health and Health Equity; Hospitalist, Brigham Health Hospital Medicine Unit, Division of General Internal Medicine & Primary Care, Brigham and Women’s Hospital

    Panelists:

    • Linda Rae Murray, MD, MPH, FACP, Adjunct Assistant Professor, School of Public Health, University of Illinois; Chief Medical Officer, Cook County Department of Public Health - Retired; Past President American Public Health Association

    DISCLOSURE: All individuals including course directors, planners, reviewers, faculty, staff, etc., who are in a position to control the content of this educational activity have, on behalf of themselves and their spouse or partner, reported no financial relationships related to the content of this activity.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to:

    • Define social and structural determinants of health and how they relate to COVID-19 outbreaks
    • Identify examples of structural racism in their own environments
    • Discuss challenges related to addressing structural racism as it relates to health in the communities where they serve

    METHOD OF PARTICIPATION: Review audio/video content, complete the comprehensive activity evaluation, and score 75% on the required post-test to assess the knowledge gained from reviewing the program.

    ACCREDITATION:

    PHYSICIANS

    The Harvard Medical School is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

    The Harvard Medical School designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

    RESOURCES FOR FURTHER STUDY:

    https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMp2023616

    https://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1164/rccm.202005-1523PP

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7263522/

    HARDWARE/SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS: Windows 7, 8, or 10 on PC and Mac OS X or above on Mac computers with the most current version web browser (Internet Explorer or Edge, Firefox, Safari, and Chrome) for each.

    If you experience technical difficulties, you can contact ceprograms@hms.harvard.edu.

    DISCLAIMER: Continuing education activities sponsored by Harvard Medical School are offered solely for educational purposes and do not constitute any form of certification of competency. Practitioners should always consult additional sources of information and exercise their best professional judgment before making clinical decisions of any kind.

    PRIVACY AND CONFIDENTIALITY: The Harvard Medical School Privacy Policy may be viewed here: https://hms.harvard.edu/privacy-policy